Essays Over Thomas Jefferson

Essays Over Thomas Jefferson-63
He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently the nation's first secretary of state under President George Washington from 1790 to 1793.

He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently the nation's first secretary of state under President George Washington from 1790 to 1793.

The principal author of the Declaration of Independence, Jefferson was a proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights, motivating American colonists to break from the Kingdom of Great Britain and form a new nation; he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level.

During the American Revolution, he represented Virginia in the Continental Congress that adopted the Declaration, drafted the law for religious freedom as a Virginia legislator, and served as the second Governor of Virginia from 1779 to 1781, during the American Revolutionary War.

During his first year at the college he was given more to parties, dancing and was not very frugal with his expenditures; during his second year, regretting that he had squandered away much time and money, he applied himself to fifteen hours of study a day.

Jefferson improved his French and Greek and his skill at the violin. He read the law under Professor Wythe's tutelage to obtain his law license, while working as a law clerk in his office.

As a consolation, Jefferson gave his client some money, conceivably used to aid his escape shortly thereafter.

The British Parliament passed the Intolerable Acts in 1774, and Jefferson wrote a resolution calling for a "Day of Fasting and Prayer" in protest, as well as a boycott of all British goods.

He invoked the Natural Law to argue, "everyone comes into the world with a right to his own person and using it at his own will ...

This is what is called personal liberty, and is given him by the author of nature, because it is necessary for his own sustenance." The judge cut him off and ruled against his client.

Jefferson treasured his books, and amassed a total of three libraries in his lifetime.

The first, a library of 200 volumes started in his youth which included books inherited from his father and left to him by George Wythe, After the British burned the Library of Congress during the War of 1812, he sold this second library to the U. government to jump start the Library of Congress collection, for the price of ,950.

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